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Dean Itsuji Saranillio

Dean Itsuji Saranillio

Assistant Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis; Director, Asian/Pacific/American Studies (interim)

Ph.D. 2009 (American Culture), University of Michigan; M.A. 2003 (Asian American Studies), University of California, Los Angeles; B.A. 2001 (Ethnic Studies), University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

Office Address: 

20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor New York, NY 10003

Phone: 

212-998-7596

Fax: 

212-995-4665

Areas of Research/Interest: 

cultural politics at the intersection of diaspora and indigeneity; indigenous critical theory; cultural studies; settler colonial studies; U.S. militarism; asian american and pacific islander history; epistemology and decolonization; U.S. empire.

External Affiliations:

Association for Asian American Studies; Native American and Indigenous Studies Association; American Studies Association.

Fellowships/Honors:

University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellow (2009-2011)


“Why Asian Settler Colonialism Matters: a Thought Piece on Critiques, Debates, and Indigenous Difference,” in Patrick Wolfe (ed.) settler colonial studies Vol. 3, No. 3-4 (Routledge, 2013): 280-294.

“Colliding Histories: Hawai‘i Statehood at the Intersection of Asians ‘Ineligible to Citizenship’ and Hawaiians ‘Unfit for Self-Government,’” in Journal of Asian American Studies Vol. 13, No. 3 (The John Hopkins University Press, October 2010): 283-309. * Nominated for "Most Thought-Provoking Article of 2010 in Native American and Indigenous Studies" from the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, May 2010.

“Kēwaikaliko’s Benocide: Reversing the Imperial Gaze of Rice v. Cayetano and its Legal Progeny,” in American Quarterly vol. 62, no. 3 (The John Hopkins University Press, September 2010): 457-476. * Volume received Special Recognition from the American Studies Association's Constance M. Rourke Committee, 2011.

“Colonial Amnesia: Rethinking Filipino ‘American’ Settler Empowerment in the U.S. Colony of Hawai‘i,” in Antonio Tiongson, Ricardo Gutierrez, Edgardo Gutierrez (ed.) Positively No Filipinos Allowed: Building Communities and Discourse (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006), 124-141.

Reprint: “Kēwaikaliko’s Benocide: Reversing the Imperial Gaze of Rice v. Cayetano and its Legal Progeny,”in Paul Lai and Lindsey Claire Smith (ed.) Alternative Contact: Indigeneity, Globalism, and American Studies (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2011), 51-70.

Reprint: “Colonial Amnesia: Rethinking Filipino ‘American’ Settler Empowerment in the U.S. Colony of Hawai‘i,” in Candace Fujikane and Jonathan Okamura (ed.) Asian Settler Colonialism: From Local Governance to the Politics of Everyday Life in Hawai‘i (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2008), 256-278.
Updated on 10/28/2013